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When you meet the other, you meet yourself

I was not a rich kid, nor a poor one. I know how it felt to not have things, whether is was exotic foods or nice clothes and to interact with people that did. When I relate to the children in Kenya or anywhere else where there is poverty, I don’t see myself as the “rich” girl who can offer material stuff or save somebody. I don’t perceive the gap when it comes to feelings. I am overwhelmed with too many strong emotions. I cannot detach hence rationalise.

Recently, I was lucky enough to spend some hours in a Maasai village, interact with the grownups and the kids, hear the stories, see how they live, what’s their daily routine, what they eat, how they love and respect the nature and wild life and hear them talk highly about their tribe (men and women) and their traditions. Did you know that the Maasai don’t eat wild game? Did you know that most lions don’t hunt the cattle because they somehow understand that it is not theirs to have? There is absolutely no other place in this world where I have seen so much respect for the nature and animals in general. A cheetah sleeping in a bush 50 meters away from a small kid herding his cattle. Might I say mutual respect?

I am constantly taught that my ideal world does exist.

I don’t know for how long the Maasai will remain uncontaminated by our ways, our needs and our weaknesses but today I got a glance into yet another different world, so different and so similar when it comes to goodness of heart, happiness and love for one another.

When I started my journey one year ago, I needed to reconnect with the world, I needed the world to teach me once more how beautiful it is and mostly how beautiful people are. It is easy to get caught up in negative thoughts, negative patterns, misanthropy, distrust every time you read the news or every time you are constrained to live a reality in which you cannot blend into the whole and feel part of it.

To relearn that most people are awesome was much easier and faster than suspected. It took letting go and not expecting anything. It took going alone somewhere very different from what I was used to and having no choice but to trust strangers. I cannot say how many hours or days, or weeks it takes, but it is really a very short time. Escaping your own dictatorship and expectations and embracing vulnerability, lack of control and knowledge as routine, will be the best medicine against depression, anxiety, lack of confidence, feeling and seeing all wrong.

What I found out after my trip in Kenya was that I had so much love trapped inside of me, love that I didn’t know how to use and how to release. That knot in my throat, was just a tap to my so many bottled emotions. As soon as I had the chance to be nobody but part of everything, I could just let go knowing it will all mix and shape my surroundings for the better. When you have nothing to show and have no one to be in the eyes of the others, you really become aware that to love and to be loved even if for just one smile or a hi five with a child in the middle of nowhere is the highest degree of happiness that you will ever get to experience. Somehow, your presence, your life, the life of the other it will make sense in the most unexpected of ways. I don’t know what is the technical term for this amazing energy that connects us all no matter where we come from or how much we have, but to get to experience it is the only luxury worth paying for. To be honest, I am not sure there is a different way to get there, other than traveling. I would be curious to know. 🙂

I am aware that there are a lot of bad things happening in the world and a lot of things that shouldn’t happen at all. There are plenty of wrongs, misconceptions and lives thrown away and destroyed due to errors of the mind and wounded hearts. We fight our vulnerability 24 hours a day, yet it is our most valuable tool for making wise decisions.

I asked our Maasai guide if they believe in Gods. He told me they don’t… or at least not in the same way other people do. They pray to the God of Nature – they pray to NATURE. I was embarrassed when he asked me the same thing. I told him that I believe in good and doing good.

He agreed that was the right way.

When you meet the other, you meet yourself

I was not a rich kid, nor a poor one. I know how it felt to not have things, whether is was exotic foods or nice clothes and to interact with people that did. When I relate to the children in Kenya or anywhere else where there is poverty, I don’t see myself as the “rich” girl who can offer material stuff or save somebody. I don’t perceive the gap when it comes to feelings. I am overwhelmed with too many strong emotions. I cannot detach hence rationalise.

Recently, I was lucky enough to spend some hours in a Maasai village, interact with the grownups and the kids, hear the stories, see how they live, what’s their daily routine, what they eat, how they love and respect the nature and wild life and hear them talk highly about their tribe (men and women) and their traditions. Did you know that the Maasai don’t eat wild game? Did you know that most lions don’t hunt the cattle because they somehow understand that it is not theirs to have? There is absolutely no other place in this world where I have seen so much respect for the nature and animals in general. A cheetah sleeping in a bush 50 meters away from a small kid herding his cattle. Might I say mutual respect?

I am constantly taught that my ideal world does exist.

I don’t know for how long the Maasai will remain uncontaminated by our ways, our needs and our weaknesses but today I got a glance into yet another different world, so different and so similar when it comes to goodness of heart, happiness and love for one another.

When I started my journey one year ago, I needed to reconnect with the world, I needed the world to teach me once more how beautiful it is and mostly how beautiful people are. It is easy to get caught up in negative thoughts, negative patterns, misanthropy, distrust every time you read the news or every time you are constrained to live a reality in which you cannot blend into the whole and feel part of it.

To relearn that most people are awesome was much easier and faster than suspected. It took letting go and not expecting anything. It took going alone somewhere very different from what I was used to and having no choice but to trust strangers. I cannot say how many hours or days, or weeks it takes, but it is really a very short time. Escaping your own dictatorship and expectations and embracing vulnerability, lack of control and knowledge as routine, will be the best medicine against depression, anxiety, lack of confidence, feeling and seeing all wrong.

What I found out after my trip in Kenya was that I had so much love trapped inside of me, love that I didn’t know how to use and how to release. That knot in my throat, was just a tap to my so many bottled emotions. As soon as I had the chance to be nobody but part of everything, I could just let go knowing it will all mix and shape my surroundings for the better. When you have nothing to show and have no one to be in the eyes of the others, you really become aware that to love and to be loved even if for just one smile or a hi five with a child in the middle of nowhere is the highest degree of happiness that you will ever get to experience. Somehow, your presence, your life, the life of the other it will make sense in the most unexpected of ways. I don’t know what is the technical term for this amazing energy that connects us all no matter where we come from or how much we have, but to get to experience it is the only luxury worth paying for. To be honest, I am not sure there is a different way to get there, other than traveling. I would be curious to know. 🙂

I am aware that there are a lot of bad things happening in the world and a lot of things that shouldn’t happen at all. There are plenty of wrongs, misconceptions and lives thrown away and destroyed due to errors of the mind and wounded hearts. We fight our vulnerability 24 hours a day, yet it is our most valuable tool for making wise decisions.

I asked our Maasai guide if they believe in Gods. He told me they don’t… or at least not in the same way other people do. They pray to the God of Nature – they pray to NATURE. I was embarrassed when he asked me the same thing. I told him that I believe in good and doing good.

He agreed that was the right way.

Georgiana Bularca

Georgiana Bularca

I passionately like and dislike all opposite things at the same time.

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